HM Magazine December 2011 : Page 28

28 FEATURE It’s been a few years since Sixpence None The Richer last released new music. However, lead singer Leigh Nash is sure to please the contemporary Christian music community with Hymns & Sacred Songs , as it’s filled with hymns, both old and new. Nash, ever the creative artist, takes a lot of liberties with the arrangements for some of these oftentimes very familiar songs. the only Sixpence None The Richer release in 2012. “Because it’s taken so long to get this record out, our goal is to put a couple of things out next year, so there’s not such a long pause between releases. “ Lost In Translation is a relatively famous Bill Murray movie. Yet for Sixpence None The Richer, this album title sums up a lot of what the group has been going through lately, both professionally and personally. “That just resonates with how we’ve been feeling, and how the process of just life and growing up and trying to navigate our way in the band, but also just as people, ” she says. “That just seems to describe where we stand the last few years. The original title was Strange Conversation , and that’s pretty apt as well. But we were just tired of that title, and this feels really good. ” The band is also really happy with the job their producer did. “We got to work with a producer named Jim Scott, and he just knocked it out of the park, ” Nash raves. “He is just a fantastic producer – and human, period – and just a great guy to be around. And we got to take our band out to California and make this record and just had a beautiful time doing it. It will always be one of the records that is closest to our hearts. ” Sixpence None The Richer has always been one of the most pristine, pure pop bands. With that said, Lost In Translation may reveal a different side of the band. The way Nash describes it, it might be a little rawer than what we’ve come to expect from the group. “It’s not real lush, ” she explains. “Where Divine Discontent had a lot of strings and extra bells and whistles on it, and this one was intentionally kept a little more bare to put the focus on the songs and my voice, and I think we did a really good job of it. It’s a really cool record. ” Surprisingly, when asked what it is about Sixpence None The Richer’s legacy that makes her most proud, Nash does not mention their original singles, such as “Kiss Me” and “Breathe Your Name, ” or their covers of “Don’t Dream It’s Over” or “There She Goes. ” Nash responds, “One of the most beautiful worship songs that I’ve ever heard is something that I got to sing, that being ‘Melody of You. ’” With some solo music under her belt now, Nash must divide her time between fronting a band and putting out her own work. “I enjoy both, ” she states. “Sixpence will always be one of the things that’s closest to my heart, for sure. But when things come along like this hymns record it was really perfect because I was inspired by the thought of doing it. I thought, ‘Man, this is something I can really sink my teeth into and be proud of and be happy about what I’m doing, and not to have to be out on the road to support it.’ There weren’t a ton of expectations as far as that (tour support) went. I just loved using my voice and being able to work. I feel like one of the big reasons I’m here on the planet is to sing, so I’m delighted to do it pretty much anytime under most circumstances. This was a real pleasure. ” It’s ironic that a great singer like Nash wasn’t recognized for her voice when she was in school. She sang in choirs, yes, but was by no means assertive about her talents. She was never one of the ones that sang solos, for instance. As she recalls, the singers that got the attention were the ones that were a little more “showboaty, ” as she puts it. “I was a little too quiet and shy. I didn’t think, ‘Man, I could really rip that up!’ I always thought they (the showboaty ones) sounded great, and they did. Once I got older and started singing with Sixpence and we put out that record, I probably started thinking that I might be able to sing a solo. It really scared me (back then). I was really nervous to perform on stage. “ Even though she was terribly shy at the time, she must have still realized she had innate singing talent. “I told somebody the other day, ” Nash admits, “that – singing hymns in church growing up – I think I do remember thinking I wished that some of those old ladies would be quiet so I could hear myself. ” Word to the wise: Be quiet and hear what Leigh Nash has to sing. “I didn’t grow up with those hymns, ” Nash responds, when asked about her unique approach to recording a hymns project. “I was raised Southern Baptist and they (the church hymns) were different from any of these. I hadn’t heard many of them before so it made it easier to make ‘em my own or add new melodies to ‘em. It was like just starting with really beautiful words. I didn’t have kind of the ghosts of old melodies in my head. ” Perhaps, the next time Nash records a hymns project like this one – assuming, of course, there is even a next time – she’ll choose songs drawn from her Southern Baptist upbringing. “I would absolutely love to!” she affirms. “Those are my favorite memories of church. I’m really into the beauty of the words and the way they were written back then. And certainly, the melodies as well. ” Chances are good that Nash would not reconfigure these church songs from her upbringing the way she’s rethought this latest collection of largely unfamiliar compositions. “I think that would be uncomfortable for me, though, rewriting melodies that I’m so married to and in love with from my childhood. That would be uncomfortable. ” She’s redone old songs, such as “Come Thou Fount Of Every Blessing. ” There are also newer songs, too. One of the best of these fresher hymns is Nash’s version of “Power of the Cross, ” by Keith Getty and Stuart Townend. “That’s one of my favorites as well, ” Nash says. “It gets me choked up every time. Well, all of ‘em do. I’m such a sap. ” Leigh Nash simply does a wonderful job with the hymns on this new collection. Even so, Nash is best known for her role in fronting the pop-rock band Sixpence None The Richer. The good news for Sixpence fans is that this radio favorite is alive and well. Nevertheless, it’s been tough for the band to get its new music into the hands of its fans. “We have been trying to get this record out for a couple of years, ” Nash explains, with obvious frustration in her voice. The group made the album for EMI, although the music will likely not be released on that label. “It’s got a new title, ” she continues, “it’s called Lost In Translation . We’re looking to release that in March. ” Better still, Lost In Translation may not be BY DAN MACINTOSH

Leigh Nash

Dan Macintosh

It’s been a few years since Sixpence None The Richer last released new music. However, lead singer Leigh Nash is sure to please the contemporary Christian music community with Hymns & Sacred Songs, as it’s filled with hymns, both old and new. Nash, ever the creative artist, takes a lot of liberties with the arrangements for some of these oftentimes very familiar songs.<br /> <br /> I didn’t grow up with those hymns,” Nash responds, when asked about her unique approach to recording a hymns project. “I was raised Southern Baptist and they (the church hymns) were different from any of these. I hadn’t heard many of them before so it made it easier to make ‘em my own or add new melodies to ‘em. It was like just starting with really beautiful words. I didn’t have kind of the ghosts of old melodies in my head.” Perhaps, the next time Nash records a hymns project like this one – assuming, of course, there is even a next time – she’ll choose songs drawn from her Southern Baptist upbringing. “I would absolutely love to!” she affirms. “Those are my favorite memories of church. I’m really into the beauty of the words and the way they were written back then. And certainly, the melodies as well.” Chances are good that Nash would not reconfigure these church songs from her upbringing the way she’s rethought this latest collection of largely unfamiliar compositions. “I think that would be uncomfortable for me, though, rewriting melodies that I’m so married to and in love with from my childhood. That would be uncomfortable.” <br /> <br /> She’s redone old songs, such as “Come Thou Fount Of Every Blessing.” There are also newer songs, too. One of the best of these fresher hymns is Nash’s version of “Power of the Cross,” by Keith Getty and Stuart Townend. “That’s one of my favorites as well,” Nash says. “It gets me choked up every time. Well, all of ‘em do. I’m such a sap.” <br /> <br /> Leigh Nash simply does a wonderful job with the hymns on this new collection. Even so, Nash is best known for her role in fronting the pop-rock band Sixpence None The Richer. The good news for Sixpence fans is that this radio favorite is alive and well. Nevertheless, it’s been tough for the band to get its new music into the hands of its fans.<br /> <br /> “We have been trying to get this record out for a couple of years,” Nash explains, with obvious frustration in her voice. The group made the album for EMI, although the music will likely not be released on that label. “It’s got a new title,” she continues, “it’s called Lost In Translation. We’re looking to release that in March.” Better still, Lost In Translation may not be the only Sixpence None The Richer release in 2012. “Because it’s taken so long to get this record out, our goal is to put a couple of things out next year, so there’s not such a long pause between releases. “ <br /> <br /> Lost In Translation is a relatively famous Bill Murray movie. Yet for Sixpence None The Richer, this album title sums up a lot of what the group has been going through lately, both professionally and personally.<br /> <br /> “That just resonates with how we’ve been feeling, and how the process of just life and growing up and trying to navigate our way in the band, but also just as people,” she says. “That just seems to describe where we stand the last few years. The original title was Strange Conversation, and that’s pretty apt as well. But we were just tired of that title, and this feels really good.” <br /> <br /> The band is also really happy with the job their producer did. “We got to work with a producer named Jim Scott, and he just knocked it out of the park,” Nash raves. “He is just a fantastic producer – and human, period – and just a great guy to be around. And we got to take our band out to California and make this record and just had a beautiful time doing it. It will always be one of the records that is closest to our hearts.” <br /> <br /> Sixpence None The Richer has always been one of the most pristine, pure pop bands. With that said, Lost In Translation may reveal a different side of the band. The way Nash describes it, it might be a little rawer than what we’ve come to expect from the group.<br /> <br /> “It’s not real lush,” she explains. “Where Divine Discontent had a lot of strings and extra bells and whistles on it, and this one was intentionally kept a little more bare to put the focus on the songs and my voice, and I think we did a really good job of it. It’s a really cool record.” <br /> <br /> Surprisingly, when asked what it is about Sixpence None The Richer’s legacy that makes her most proud, Nash does not mention their original singles, such as “Kiss Me” and “Breathe Your Name,” or their covers of “Don’t Dream It’s Over” or “There She Goes.” Nash responds, “One of the most beautiful worship songs that I’ve ever heard is something that I got to sing, that being ‘Melody of You.’” With some solo music under her belt now, Nash must divide her time between fronting a band and putting out her own work.<br /> <br /> “I enjoy both,” she states. “Sixpence will always be one of the things that’s closest to my heart, for sure.But when things come along like this hymns record it was really perfect because I was inspired by the thought of doing it. I thought, ‘Man, this is something I can really sink my teeth into and be proud of and be happy about what I’m doing, and not to have to be out on the road to support it.’ There weren’t a ton of expectations as far as that (tour support) went. I just loved using my voice and being able to work. I feel like one of the big reasons I’m here on the planet is to sing, so I’m delighted to do it pretty much anytime under most circumstances. This was a real pleasure.” <br /> <br /> It’s ironic that a great singer like Nash wasn’t recognized for her voice when she was in school. She sang in choirs, yes, but was by no means assertive about her talents. She was never one of the ones that sang solos, for instance.<br /> <br /> As she recalls, the singers that got the attention were the ones that were a little more “showboaty,” as she puts it. “I was a little too quiet and shy. I didn’t think, ‘Man, I could really rip that up!’ I always thought they (the showboaty ones) sounded great, and they did. Once I got older and started singing with Sixpence and we put out that record, I probably started thinking that I might be able to sing a solo. It really scared me (back then). I was really nervous to perform on stage.“ <br /> <br /> Even though she was terribly shy at the time, she must have still realized she had innate singing talent. “I told somebody the other day,” Nash admits, “that – singing hymns in church growing up – I think I do remember thinking I wished that some of those old ladies would be quiet so I could hear myself.” Word to the wise: Be quiet and hear what Leigh Nash has to sing.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here