SN 4 Spring 2012 Promo : Page 2

news shorts Out of the Dust A gravestone recently uncovered in Texas show what you know As a drought in Texas show pieces what you know continues, of the past appear G ravestones from the 1800s. Long-abandoned tools and wagon wheels. A prehistoric skull. These are just some of the very old objects that were once underwater in Texas but have recently resurfaced. Why have they reappeared? The state’s severe drought has caused lakes to dry up and reveal these pieces of history. Tombstones and other remains of a 19th-century town called Bluffton have turned up. The town was flooded when OK Dallas AR Word to Know abandoned (uh -ban -duhnd) adjective . deserted, or no longer used Lake Buchanan ( see map ) was made in 1937. A dried-up section of Richland Chambers Reservoir, another human-made lake, revealed at least 25 graves from the 1800s. The discovery at the reservoir is “a great find,” historian Bruce McManus tells Scholastic News . “Everybody hates the drought, but I needed it.” Last year was the driest one ever recorded in Texas. Farmers have been hit particularly hard by the drought because they need water for crops and cattle. Recent rainfall has brought TEXAS Lake Buchanan Richland Chambers Reservoir LA Austin State capital Scale: 0 50 MI Houston Gulf of Mexico U.S. Area of map MEXICO relief to parts of Texas, but weather experts say the drought is likely to continue for some time. That has left many Texans hoping for spring showers, even if they mean some pieces of history are hidden once again. TOP: ERIC GAY/AP IMAGES; BOTTOM: STEPHEN STICKLER/GETTY IMAGES; MAP: JIM MCMAHON/”MAPMAN” A Ban on Plastic Bags How can a city reduce its litter and cut down on the amount of plastic in its landfills? Officials in Seattle, Washington, have an answer. They recently passed a law banning stores from giving out plastic bags. The law requires shoppers to buy paper bags for five cents or bring their own reusable bags instead. Other U.S. cities, including San Francisco, have passed similar laws. Supporters of the law say that plastic doesn’t break down easily like paper does. But others say people shouldn’t have to pay for paper bags. What do you think? See page 7! 2 SCHOLASTIC NEWS EDITION 4 • FEBRUARY 6, 2012 • www.scholastic.com/sn4

News Shorts

Out of the Dust<br /> <br /> As a drought in Texas continues, pieces of the past appear<br /> <br /> Gravestones from the 1800s. Long-abandoned tools and wagon wheels.A prehistoric skull. These are just some of the very old objects that were once underwater in Texas but have recently resurfaced.<br /> <br /> Why have they reappeared?The state’s severe drought has caused lakes to dry up and reveal these pieces of history.<br /> <br /> Tombstones and other remains of a 19th-century town called Bluffton have turned up.The town was flooded when Lake Buchanan (see map) was made in 1937. A dried-up section of Richland Chambers Reservoir, another humanmade lake, revealed at least 25 graves from the 1800s.<br /> <br /> The discovery at the reservoir is “a great find,” historian Bruce McManus tells Scholastic News.“Everybody hates the drought, but I needed it.” <br /> <br /> Last year was the driest one ever recorded in Texas. Farmers have been hit particularly hard by the drought because they need water for crops and cattle.Recent rainfall has brought relief to parts of Texas, but weather experts say the drought is likely to continue for some time. That has left many Texans hoping for spring showers, even if they mean some pieces of history are hidden once again.<br /> <br /> Word to Know<br /> <br /> Abandoned (uh-ban-duhnd) adjective. Deserted, or no longer used

A Ban On Plastic Bags

How can a city reduce its litter and cut down on the amount of plastic in its landfills? Officials in Seattle, Washington, have an answer. They recently passed a law banning stores from giving out plastic bags. The law requires shoppers to buy paper bags for five cents or bring their own reusable bags instead. Other U.S. cities, including San Francisco, have passed similar laws.<br /> <br /> Supporters of the law say that plastic doesn’t break down easily like paper does. But others say people shouldn’t have to pay for paper bags. What do you think?

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